On the Runway: Suiting Up for a Ceremony, Derek Jeter Swings for the Fences The former Yankees captain made an impression with the three-piece blue suit he wore to his jersey-retirement ceremony on Sunday evening. http://ift.tt/2qL06Sb

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At the weekend Louis Vuitton presented its 2018 cruise/resort collection by Nicolas Ghesquiere, to rave reviews. For those following along on social media, you will have seen the close ups of the brand’s accessories. This season the luxury fashion house created a line of bags in celebration of iconic designer Kansaï Yamamoto. WGSN has tracked the fashion impact of Kansaï Yamamoto, who was the first Japanese fashion designer to hold a show in London back in 1971. Yamamoto is famous for his showmanship and has been making waves since 1970s. He has always pushed the boundaries of the traditional catwalk show with past productions featuring outlandish casts and bold stage sets. He is an inspiration in his positive outlook and continuous energy, which is as much reflected in his shows as it is in the collections he designs. His influence is never far from the catwalk and pop-culture, as referenced below: 2017 – Louis Vuitton SS18 cruise show Louis Vuitton speedy bag – a tribute to Kansai Yamamoto 2013- DAVID BOWIE EXHIBIT Striking patterned jacquards – best exemplified in the rock-star wardrobe genre by Kansai Yamamoto’s groundbreaking designs for David Bowie in his Ziggy Stardust era – are infiltrating contemporary menswear, with bold mosaic, color-blocked and blanket-stripe patterns emerging for S/S 14. The singer-designer duo’s legendary collaborations were featured in the seminal 2013 exhibit David Bowie Is at London’s Victoria and Albert Museum. As well as an outstanding musician and performer, Bowie was a huge influence on fashion, with the V&A exhibition featuring some of the most memorable stage looks. Channeling an androgynous and avant-garde persona, on display are outfits including Kansai Yamamoto’s Rites of Spring jumpsuit which was made for the 1973 Aladdin Sane Tour, as well as the Pierrot costume, designed by Natasha Korniloff featured on the cover for Scary Monsters…(and Super Creeps) (1980). 2011 – BOLD INTARSIAS ON THE CATWALK Bold intarsias are re-emerging on runways and streets as 70s and 80s knitwear influences fashion. Though intarsia techniques have existed for centuries, it was knitwear wunderkind Schiaparelli in the 20s, and later Kansai Yamamoto, Zandra Rhodes, and Stephen Burrows in the 70s-80s who traded in traditional argyle intarsias for trompe l’oeil motifs and wildly creative patterns. Designers introduced abstract geometric motifs and figurative styles for F/W 11 and S/S 12, and adventurous intarsias are cropping up on streets around the globe 2009- ANIMAL MAGIC KNITS Ashish 2009/10 Throughout the 80s iconic design houses such as Kenzo, Krizia and Kansai Yamamoto helped define the decade with their ostentatious knitwear emblazoned with bold and often brash animal motifs. The appeal of witty knitwear quickly reached craft circles, who have adopted intarsia techniques to incorporate a large range of animal figures onto their hand-knitted jumpers. The trend later trickled down into childrenswear where it remained relegated for the early part of the 90s. The post Fashion Influencer: Celebrating the work of Kansaï Yamamoto appeared first on WGSN Insider. http://ift.tt/2rjBhsH

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For many within the fashion and retail sphere, Tokyo is a must-visit destination brimming with inspiration (from the architecture to the natural landscapes) and emerging design talent. During a recent trip as part of the youth team here at WGSN, I sought out that buzzing inspiration and also made a point to check out every store, and designer I could within the time frame (I was never not exploring and researching, except for during snack breaks). I came back enthused and feeling extra creative, and since I couldn’t take you with me in my suitcase, the least I can do is offer up a blog on my retail highlights. Enjoy. Since neighbouring Seoul’s rise in popularity due to K-pop, their beauty industry and strength in streetwear, some may argue that Tokyo has since faded into the background, but no way. Tokyo’s cultural place in fashion, design and art is still so impactful, thanks to the renaissance Harajuku goths, the Kawaii princesses in marshmallow pastels, the 90s sports stars, linen minimalists who practice the Mari Kondo life and of course, the hardcore Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo fans dressed in layered, draped black – these are the authentic characters that inhabit Tokyo and are great sources of inspiration. Plus, Tokyo also plays home to some of the most dynamic architectural buildings and retail spaces in the luxury market such as Prada, Dover St Market, and Bape. Youth fashion: doverstreetmarketginza Their merchandising and acute attention to styling is also like no where else in the world. YOUTH TRENDS Knitwear: Classic American knitwear brands were featured in any vintage store and young department store. Champion, Healthknit, Hanes and Gildan shirts are the must have basics. Colour: these knits are then dyed in the freshest of pastels and the crispiest neutrals (the two standout color stories in the Japanese youth market). Millennial pink is fading out to icy lilacs and neutrals range from a grainy bone beige to dirty champagne. Fit: Overall there is an importance on proportion play as items are generally worn with ease/ slight oversize. This is key in knitwear, menswear inspired jackets, vintage Levi’s overcoats and the pant silhouette of high waisted with a wide leg. There wasn’t a body con in sight – there is an overriding sense of layering and injecting volume on the mainstream, petite Japanese figure. STORE VISITS Journal Standard, Omotesando Hills – 3 fantastic floors of youth related womenswwear, plus they carry an amazing selection of young menswear too X- Girl – Really enjoyed visiting this store as it is specifically for Millennial/ Gen Z girl skaters. Originally founded by Kim Gordon in NYC it was revived by her daughter with the Tokyo trendsetters in mind, frequently featured in Nylon Japan. The brand also recently collaborated with Yayoi Kusama and Playboy Dover St Market, Ginza – if not for the selection, the installations and enter visual merchandising is a treat. I also really loved the CDG Good Design Shop, Harajuku – your favourite CDG amongst industrial, interior and stationary design goods with a PLAY booth downstairs H Beauty and Youth – a boutique department store just for the young women and market, fit with a vintage store. The retail space is not merchandised by brand but rather lifestyle and conceptual stories BEAMS women, Shibuya – a 2-storey boutique offering an eclectic mix of urban and unique Japanese femininity The post Youth fashion: Tokyo’s retail scene and the key trends to know appeared first on WGSN Insider. http://ift.tt/2qo1nvq

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