Critic’s Notebook: The Look of the French Election Marine Le Pen used costume to cast herself as the mother of France, and Emmanuel Macron’s sober suit was modified as his poll numbers shifted. http://ift.tt/2pGunOu

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The reality of things is that we’re aiming to spend more time outside and we expect the outdoor space to have the same comforts, flexibility and design standards that we can find inside our homes. We want to be able to work, sleep, take a shower, meditate and spend prolonged time outside all-year-round, and at the same time, make sure the surroundings match our needs. And, in the same way that we want to reconnect with nature, creating a welcoming and uplifting environment by bringing the greenery indoors, we are increasingly taking the indoors environment (think: modern conveniences and maximum comfort) out to the green. Claesson Koivisto Rune- the rise of luxe outdoor space H&M Home We’ve been tracking this direction for a while here at WGSN Lifestyle & Interiors, and it’s really exciting to see how it’s evolving and growing year on year – we got new confirmation of this trend at Milan Design Week last month, where the majority of the outdoor launches across Salone and Fuorisalone were indeed revolving around this idea. Products are becoming increasingly refined and sophisticated and really live up to their indoors counterparts in function and style, as consumers are willing to invest in higher-value and long-lasting pieces. Textiles are being developed with ever more sophisticated textures, while furniture is getting softer in look and touch, disguising outdoor requirements to the point it’s hard to distinguish between what’s meant for indoor and what for outdoor. Sideboards, shelving units, storage pieces, coffee tables and multipurpose accessories have started to make an appearance in outdoor living collections, alongside rugs, curtains and wallpaper. Left to right: Kettal, Holly Hunt Antonio Citterio for B&B Italia Outdoor sofas can be composed to fit the user’s needs thanks to modular systems and flexible arrangements and outdoor lighting has never been so design-led, ranging from beautiful indoor-like floor lamps to stylish portable lanterns. Left to right: Cox & Cox, Barber & Osgerby x Dedon Paola Lenti So, what’s next? With the outdoor lifestyle gaining ground and the outdoor segment taking centre stage, the transition from in/out to out/in will become absolutely seamless. Families with young kids and consumers looking for mess-free solutions have already started migrating outdoor fabrics indoors, favouring them for their low-maintenance and easy-clean qualities. In a few seasons, we won’t be able to choose which sofa we love spending more time on, in or out? The post Why your outdoor space looks like your living room appeared first on WGSN Insider. http://ift.tt/2pGm9Gd

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Last week in the heart of Williamsburg at Brooklyn’s National Sawdust, a new wave of designers hit the catwalk with their creations. But this was not any old catwalk, it was the ‘47 Redesign Runway Fashion Show, the result of a fashion partnership between sports lifestyle apparel company 47′ and the design school Pratt Institute. The idea was to pick the coolest new wave of designers and set them up with a design challenge: use deadstock ’47 apparel, accessories and headwear to create one-of-a-kind micro-collections. The result? A runway offering up a mix of traditional loungewear, as well as sports inspired dressed and jackets. The whole event was judged by design duo and CFDA/Vogue Fashion Finalists, Rochambeau, Aluna Francis of musical duo AlunaGeorge, and the Pratt faculty. We caught up with the designers to talk about the project, this idea of sustainability in fashion, and making something new and exciting from old fabric. Check out the rising design talent below: ‘47 Redesign: Designer Elle Quesada ’47 redesign project designer Elle For Elle designing clothes is something she’s done since she was a kid in high school, both as a way of creating the latest fashion and as an outlet for her creativity. Her theme for the project was all about origin stories and telling them through the medium of garment creation. “When we were first presented with the project we spoke to the ’47 designers and they explained what the brand meant to them, the origins of the brand as a family business, and that’s what I got from the meeting- that idea really stuck with me and so that’s what my collection focused on, origin story”. Better yet she got the opportunity to work with materials that she hadn’t worked with in the past, switching from her usual aesthetic of fine silks and organza, to sweat and jersey material. “It was really fun to use these materials and play with drape, as I’m normally a pattern person. Also the deadstock was hella comfy, so comfy that we were trying stuff on in the studio. It was exciting to then transform these traditional loungewear clothes, taking them out of their element.” Brittany Lovegrove For Brittany the ’47 Redesign project offered up the chance to play with fabrics that have a 3D surface. She used all the discarded hats for her collection, “the hats already had a shape to them, so it was really fun experimenting with this 3D surface and seeing how it fit the form, rather than my normal process of using a flat fabric.” The project also gave Brittany the chance to have a better understanding of the fashion and retail industry, how to build a brand, create a collection and work within a fashion company. Fiona Cole Fiona’s excitement for the project came from being able to experiment with clothes and work with unusual shapes. Rather than seeing it as an unsurmountable challenge Fiona relished the chance to play with the hats and shirts. ” I enjoyed working with the shapes that existed and playing around with the negative spaces I found, career wise I don’t have a specific goal, so projects like this are the perfect way to experiment and see what I like”. This was all about creating as you go along, thinking outside of her comfort zone, with very exciting results. Jun Young Woo For Jun Young Woo, the project was an opportunity to use fashion as a way of finding connections. Her starting point was connecting the dots with the fabric and finding similarities between the idea of Japanese armour and the American football uniform. She then started to draw and paint her garment ideas. “The project was great for me in terms of getting brand experience, creating a collection for a runway show and dealing with lots of garments at one time, plus I got to use knit fabrics, which was a first for me.” Michaela Frolick Through the project, Michaela learned what it was really like to be a designer, from sketch to finish, and the creative ways to get the collection done no matter what. “It was exciting to be able to make anything I wanted from a completely different type of clothing. Also I don’t use a lot of colour, and these garments were bright so I took advantage of that to create something new.” Check out our Facebook Live of the runway show below: ’47 X Pratt Institute Posted by WGSN on Thursday, April 27, 2017 Like this? Follow 47 the brand on Instagram here Want more emerging talent articles? Check out our feature on the rising stars of Central Saint Martins here. The post How sports lifestyle brand ’47 is helping the next generation of design talent appeared first on WGSN Insider. http://ift.tt/2pGyz0z

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